What does shockwave therapy do?

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment that involves the delivery of shockwaves to injured soft tissues to reduce pain and promote healing. Shockwave therapy is a multidisciplinary device used in orthopedics, physiotherapy, sports medicine, urology and veterinary medicine.

What does shockwave therapy do?

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment that involves the delivery of shockwaves to injured soft tissues to reduce pain and promote healing. Shockwave therapy is a multidisciplinary device used in orthopedics, physiotherapy, sports medicine, urology and veterinary medicine. Its main assets are rapid pain relief and restoration of mobility. Along with being a non-surgical therapy without the need for analgesics, it is an ideal therapy to accelerate recovery and cure various indications that cause acute or chronic pain.

Shockwaves are sound waves that have specific physical characteristics, including non-linearity, high peak pressure followed by low traction amplitude, short rise time and short duration (10 ms). They have a single pulse, a wide frequency range (0-20 MHz) and a high pressure amplitude (0-120 MPa). Shockwave therapy is an innovative therapy that can target specific pain in bones, joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments. It is a non-invasive treatment that can be administered on an outpatient basis and provides significant or total pain relief in the vast majority of patients.

Shockwave therapy for the treatment of chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy in professional athletes. King Edward VII Hospital offers shock wave therapy and here, Consultant Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Mr. Lloyd Williams, explains how treatment works, what conditions it can be effective for and who might be appropriate. Therefore, shock wave therapy is a type of targeted therapy, which only treats injured or damaged areas.

Shockwave therapy should not be used if there is a circulatory or nervous disorder, infection, bone tumor, or bone metabolic condition. Achilles tendinopathy was diagnosed in 78 patients, 65 patients in the shockwave group (27 men and 38 women) and 13 patients in the control group (6 men and 7 women). However, in this study, shock wave treatment showed similar results to those of previous studies in patients suffering from plantar fasciitis, elbow tendinopathy, Achilles tendinopathy, and rotator cuff tendinopathy. Therefore, patients who did not respond to conventional treatment for any of the above tendinopathies can use shockwave therapy as an alternative method, which can significantly improve pain, functionality and quality of life.

They can easily penetrate the skin and, once pierced, radiate as a shock wave throughout the affected muscle, joint or tendon. In addition, comparisons were also made between the shock wave intervention groups and the control groups. As a result, Cosentino et al (2) found significant improvement in pain, daily activities and range of motion by applying 4 shockwave sessions of 1200 shocks after treatment and follow-up evaluations at one and six months using a VAS and a Constant-Murley score. The Effects of Extracproreal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) in the Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis in People Aged 40 to 50.

Radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy is safe and effective in the treatment of chronic recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. plantar fasciitis was diagnosed in 103 patients, of whom 88 constituted the shock wave group (36 men and 52 women) and 15 the control group (7 men and 8 women). Shockwave therapy initiates biochemical decalcification of calcium buildup of a toothpaste-like consistency and treats the tendon. Shockwave therapy is a non-invasive, non-surgical treatment, but you may feel a little pain or discomfort in the treatment area during the procedure.

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Trent Monserrate
Trent Monserrate

Devoted beer buff. Incurable bacon aficionado. Award-winning creator. Amateur web buff. Wannabe zombie fan.

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